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What's Next? 8 ways to move on..

It is still early, only twenty four hours since many of us woke up to find that what we had hoped did not happen. The referendum, for many is lost, and the reaction is fierce. What follows are a few ideas of how to navigate the next wee while.

Be Real
If this hurts, hurt. If it make us feel scared, be scared. Anger and blame are great displacements- and they have their moment (which is still now, don’t just squash it) - but get as close to the real feelings as you can. And take that moment to acknowledge that for many of us part of the challenge is that we are not used to getting our own way.

Be Kind
If you are reading this, the outcome is worse for many other people. They may have voted for it, but they will suffer. Be kind. And be kind to those who are very fearful. Being an EU worker at this moment must feel pretty grim. Be kind.

Switch Off
How many of us have run our phone batteries dry in the last 24 hours? The urge to check social media and keep abreast of what s going on is huge. But it will drive us to more fear and worry. Limit the interaction, not to stick our heads in the sand, but to remember that life is more than this. Put your phone down, give someone a hug and play some frisby.

Stay Engaged
A lot of young people voted in the referendum. If we walk away from the political process now we will miss an opportunity. The last few elections have been won because of an older vote that has been pandered to.  Don’t ever let that happen again.

Put Some Skin in the Game
Every successful social movement has had self-control and has been prepared to put bodies on the line. Be ready to protest. Be polite and don’t be angry in it, but be prepared to be treated badly anyway. But it will work. And be ready to flier and protest and write and march. Just signing an online petition won’t do this.

Put Some More Skin in the Game
It seems that whilst the vote does not imply a universal racism, those who were racist before the vote are emboldened.  Don’t believe everything you see on social media, but if you see someone being obnoxious, challenge it. Stand in the way of hatred, physically if you have to.

Be Around People Who Aren’t Like You
Andy Flannagan has written much more eloquently about this: but people will be influenced by the things around them. So be around them. Time will tell that white working class voters will not get what they voted for. That’s a powerful alliance that could grow to get a better outcome.

Read the Story

If you are a Christian, we have to remember that our hope is not in the EU; its in Jesus. The story of God and his people has always been that He is faithful with our unfaithfulness. He loves us, he loves people who voted to leave, sit in that, however uncomfortable it feels.

Comments

Kezzie said…
Well written Jude!

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